How to Change Your Name After Marriage

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Now that you’ve walked down the aisle with style, said “I do” and come back from your honeymoon it is time to think about name change after marriage. Whether you hyphenate, take two last names, replace your middle name with your maiden name or simply take your spouse’s last name the married name change process has the same steps to follow.

1

Research your state’s name change policies.

Certain states do not allow maiden to middle name change via the married name change process, so take a few moments to find out what options are available for your name change after marriage.

2

Order 2-3 Copies of your certified marriage certificate.

Most government agencies require a certified marriage certificate to be filed with your name change application. Having a few copies will allow you to file multiple forms simultaneously and streamline the process of transitioning from Miss to Mrs. Where do you request certified marriage certificates?
Send your request to the county clerks office that issued your marriage license.

3

Change your name with Social Security.

Complete and file the SS-5 form to update your name with the Social Security Administration. Your new card with your new married name will be mailed back to you within 2 weeks, but your social security number will not change.

4

Notify the IRS of your new married name.

Alert the IRS of your name change with the IRS 8822. Filing this brief form by mail will ensure that the IRS recognizes your married name and doesn't hold your tax returns (which is zero fun).

5

Update your name on your US Passport.

Depending on your current passport status, you should complete one of the three passport forms. If you've had your passport for less than 12 months, you can file for a new passport in your new married name for free using the DS-5504. If your current passport is more than 12 months old, you should file the DS-82* to update your name.
*There is a $110 filing fee for your new passport.

6

File for a new driver’s license with your new married name.

Once your federal forms are filed, it is time to change your name on your license. Be prepared to have a new photo take (woohoo!) and to provide your certified marriage license and proof of state residence.
*Some states will need to see your new Social Security card with your new married name to allow maiden to middle name change.

7

Change your name on your voter registration.

If your driver’s license form doesn't have a voter registration section, your next step is to file a free name change form with your county voter registration office. Most simply need a signature and certified marriage certificate to make the switch.

8

Notify your employer and all of your creditors of your new name.

Now comes the fun part, updating your name with your banks, credit cards, insurances, utility providers, medical providers, professional licenses, gym memberships, frequent flyer programs, magazines, etc. The list may seem endless, but the sooner you start changing your name the sooner you’ll officially be a Mrs.

9

Update your email and social media accounts.

When changing to your married name on your social media accounts, consider keeping your maiden name as a second last name (regardless of your actual married name).
Why? This will allow friends and colleagues who knew you under your maiden name to find you on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn and all the other places you may socially engage.

10

Skip all the tedious steps about with an online name change service.

Go from Miss to Mrs. in 30 minutes with the MissNowMrs easy legal name change service and helpful name change experts! You’ll answers a few questions and all the necessary forms and notification letters will be auto-completed for you.

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FUN FACT
DID YOU KNOW?
88.6%



of brides change their
names after marriage



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Big QuotesEasy, easy, easy! I’ve been dreading going through this entire process, and now for the most part I’ll only need is stamps and envelopes! Fantastic, totally worth the fee. — Johanna J.